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Norway – The Lysefjord (2) – Ulvaskog

Norway – The Lysefjord (2) – Ulvaskog

This is a nice hike from the parking lot on the Botne road to the timber cabin called Ulvaskoghytta and on to Preikestolhytta.

The Lysefjord in south-western Norway is a perfect example of a Norwegian fjord: Steep mountains, rough scenery, spectacular views, a lot of weather. It also serves as a superb hiking ground for numerous trips. This is one of them.

Denne fotturen er også omtalt i den norskspråklige delen av Sandalsand.

 

What do discover

This is a pleasant little hike of only 7 km, but being so varied it might take you 5 hours with a long break in the middle.

The path goes a bit up and down from the main road at Botne before reaching the timber cabin at Ulvaskog (Wolf’s Forest). This cabin was used by the Resistance during World War II and makes an idyllic resting place before continuing on to Preikestolhytta. The vegetation is quite varied on this hike, and so are the differences in altitude. As the name Ulvaskog implies the hike will pass through some forests. A part of the forest is very old – bent pine trees are beautiful you know.

The Preikestolhytta is a large tourist mountain lodge at the starting point for hikes to the Pulpit Rock.

 

 

The perfect journey is never finished, the goal is always just across the next river, round the shoulder of the next mountain. There is always one more track to follow, one more mirage to explore. (Rosita Forbes)

 

Practicalities

Lysefjorden rundt - Ulvaskog

 

You can of course hike from both ends, or even as a return hike from either end to Ulvaskog. Driving your own car is an obvious way of getting here, but you will need to do some planning if you only have one car or plan on using public transportation.

 

All blog entries and videos in this series

(0) Introduction
(1) The fjord by boat
(2) Ulvaskog
(3) Preikestolen – The Pulpit Rock
(4) Songedalen
(5) Kjerag
(6) Vinddalen

 

Have a look at some pictures from this hike: 

 

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